Categories
World News

3 Brilliant Ways to Transform Leftover Stuffing

Every year, I look forward to Thanksgiving as an opportunity to eat bread by the spoonful. That’s all stuffing is: bread, which is already delicious, made more perfect by being ripped into bite-size bits, tossed with seasonings and mix-ins, and baked until crisp on the outside but still squishy and soft on the inside. It’s forkable, ideal for sopping and ready to play nice with whatever else is on the plate.

I grew up in a Stove Top household, but fancied up, with milk swapped in for water, and seared giblets and sautéed vegetables added to the stuffing mix. It would appear once a year alongside all the classics: jellied cranberry sauce from the can, sliced thick along every other ridge; creamy green bean casserole topped with French’s fried onions; and a basket of doughy Pillsbury crescent rolls.

Over time, we’ve moved away from the traditional Thanksgiving spread, sometimes opting for roast duck instead of turkey, and losing the canned sauce for fresh cranberry-pomegranate relish. But I still love a casserole dish filled with stuffing; nothing else hits me with all the nostalgia of those cream-of-something soup years.

I also believe that stuffing is the pinnacle of Thanksgiving leftovers. Not only can you make stuffing with any bread, mix-ins and seasonings, it’s also a chameleon of an ingredient, ready to take any form you want to give it — quite literally. I’m enamored by how I can smash and squash stuffing, bend it to my will, to make something totally new. Show me a roast turkey that can do that!

Anywhere you might find bread, stuffing can step in and step it up, bringing with it a certain holiday flair. For my Thanksgiving leftovers turkey club, I press the stuffing into a big slab as thick as a slice of bread before cutting it into squares and griddling until seared and toasty. Each square then replaces the middle slice of bread in my turkey club, a distinctive divider for the rest of the sandwich layers. Everyone knows the sandwich you make the day after Thanksgiving is the best part of the holiday, and now it may be the best sandwich you eat all year.

This pressed-and-fried technique is useful beyond sandwiches. I also like to squeeze stuffing into a loaf pan, so it’s dense and thick, before chilling and cutting it into chunky cubes. I’ll fry the cubes until they are crackly and golden on the outside and tender and custardy on the inside. These delicate yet rich stuffing pieces top a salad of mixed greens and shaved crunchy vegetables that’s dressed with cranberry vinaigrette. It’s hot and cold, creamy and crisp, and a way to eat holiday food while technically also having a salad.

Anything bread can do, stuffing can do better, and this is especially true of dumpling soup. I mash leftover stuffing with a splash of turkey stock until all the big nuggets are broken up. Then I’ll stir in eggs, flour and baking powder to make a dumpling dough. I’ll simmer a simple bone broth with the turkey carcass — another hero of Thanksgiving leftovers — and then load up the soup with kale and sweet potato before dropping in dollops of the stuffing dumpling mix. The dumplings soak up the broth, growing plump and tender, while also adding body to the soup. Because the stuffing is already packed with flavor, the dumplings are too, without any extra help from you.

Regardless of what your holiday plans are, whether you’re cooking for only a few people or skipping the turkey altogether, go ahead and make all the stuffing. I will be making a family-size casserole for my teeny pod of two because I am here for the leftovers. I’ll be playing with my food, transforming stuffing into something new, and I hope you will be too.

Recipes: Best Thanksgiving Leftovers Sandwich | Stuffing Panzanella With Cranberry Vinaigrette | Stuffing Dumpling Soup

And to Drink …

Turkey sandwiches with cranberry? Salad with stuffing croutons? Soup? Regardless of how you decide to eat your leftovers, your best choice for wine is to finish whichever bottles were left over from the holiday feast. Just as you are efficiently creating dishes that may be even more satisfying than the original meal, why not be as economical with the wine? Whether Beaujolais, Oregon chardonnay or any bottles you were creative enough to open the night before, enjoy them in the same spirit of relief and joy that comes with a successful meal and the realization that you don’t have to do it again for an entire year. You drank all the wine last night? Then reward yourself with the beer or cider of your choice. ERIC ASIMOV

Follow NYT Food on Twitter and NYT Cooking on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest. Get regular updates from NYT Cooking, with recipe suggestions, cooking tips and shopping advice.

Source: Leftovers with Stuffing

Highlights

Categories
World News

3 Brilliant Ways to Transform Leftover Stuffing

Every year, I look forward to Thanksgiving as an opportunity to eat bread by the spoonful. That’s all stuffing is: bread, which is already delicious, made more perfect by being ripped into bite-size bits, tossed with seasonings and mix-ins, and baked until crisp on the outside but still squishy and soft on the inside. It’s forkable, ideal for sopping and ready to play nice with whatever else is on the plate.

I grew up in a Stove Top household, but fancied up, with milk swapped in for water, and seared giblets and sautéed vegetables added to the stuffing mix. It would appear once a year alongside all the classics: jellied cranberry sauce from the can, sliced thick along every other ridge; creamy green bean casserole topped with French’s fried onions; and a basket of doughy Pillsbury crescent rolls.

Over time, we’ve moved away from the traditional Thanksgiving spread, sometimes opting for roast duck instead of turkey, and losing the canned sauce for fresh cranberry-pomegranate relish. But I still love a casserole dish filled with stuffing; nothing else hits me with all the nostalgia of those cream-of-something soup years.

I also believe that stuffing is the pinnacle of Thanksgiving leftovers. Not only can you make stuffing with any bread, mix-ins and seasonings, it’s also a chameleon of an ingredient, ready to take any form you want to give it — quite literally. I’m enamored by how I can smash and squash stuffing, bend it to my will, to make something totally new. Show me a roast turkey that can do that!

Anywhere you might find bread, stuffing can step in and step it up, bringing with it a certain holiday flair. For my Thanksgiving leftovers turkey club, I press the stuffing into a big slab as thick as a slice of bread before cutting it into squares and griddling until seared and toasty. Each square then replaces the middle slice of bread in my turkey club, a distinctive divider for the rest of the sandwich layers. Everyone knows the sandwich you make the day after Thanksgiving is the best part of the holiday, and now it may be the best sandwich you eat all year.

This pressed-and-fried technique is useful beyond sandwiches. I also like to squeeze stuffing into a loaf pan, so it’s dense and thick, before chilling and cutting it into chunky cubes. I’ll fry the cubes until they are crackly and golden on the outside and tender and custardy on the inside. These delicate yet rich stuffing pieces top a salad of mixed greens and shaved crunchy vegetables that’s dressed with cranberry vinaigrette. It’s hot and cold, creamy and crisp, and a way to eat holiday food while technically also having a salad.

Anything bread can do, stuffing can do better, and this is especially true of dumpling soup. I mash leftover stuffing with a splash of turkey stock until all the big nuggets are broken up. Then I’ll stir in eggs, flour and baking powder to make a dumpling dough. I’ll simmer a simple bone broth with the turkey carcass — another hero of Thanksgiving leftovers — and then load up the soup with kale and sweet potato before dropping in dollops of the stuffing dumpling mix. The dumplings soak up the broth, growing plump and tender, while also adding body to the soup. Because the stuffing is already packed with flavor, the dumplings are too, without any extra help from you.

Regardless of what your holiday plans are, whether you’re cooking for only a few people or skipping the turkey altogether, go ahead and make all the stuffing. I will be making a family-size casserole for my teeny pod of two because I am here for the leftovers. I’ll be playing with my food, transforming stuffing into something new, and I hope you will be too.

Recipes: Best Thanksgiving Leftovers Sandwich | Stuffing Panzanella With Cranberry Vinaigrette | Stuffing Dumpling Soup

And to Drink …

Turkey sandwiches with cranberry? Salad with stuffing croutons? Soup? Regardless of how you decide to eat your leftovers, your best choice for wine is to finish whichever bottles were left over from the holiday feast. Just as you are efficiently creating dishes that may be even more satisfying than the original meal, why not be as economical with the wine? Whether Beaujolais, Oregon chardonnay or any bottles you were creative enough to open the night before, enjoy them in the same spirit of relief and joy that comes with a successful meal and the realization that you don’t have to do it again for an entire year. You drank all the wine last night? Then reward yourself with the beer or cider of your choice. ERIC ASIMOV

Follow NYT Food on Twitter and NYT Cooking on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest. Get regular updates from NYT Cooking, with recipe suggestions, cooking tips and shopping advice.

Source: Leftovers with Stuffing

Highlights

Categories
World News

18 Five-Ingredient Thanksgiving Recipes

You don’t have to plan and cook for days to have a memorable Thanksgiving meal. These simple recipes call for just five ingredients or fewer (not including salt and pepper), so you can get dinner on the table and get to the best part: eating.

1. Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

A scattering of pomegranate seeds makes this brussels sprouts dish from Colu Henry look fancy. But it’s really just a matter of roasting the sprouts with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, then tossing with chopped walnuts and the ruby seeds.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

2. Buttermilk-Brined Turkey Breast

Samin Nosrat’s buttermilk-brined roast chicken has long been one of NYT Cooking’s most popular recipes. It stands to reason then that the same technique applied to a whole turkey and turkey breast would yield extraordinary results.

Recipes: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey Breast and Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey

3. Potatoes Au Gratin

The key to Mark Bittman’s potatoes au gratin is to season as you go so that each slice of potato has flavor. (Potatoes suck up a lot of salt.) If you’re looking to up your game, add fresh thyme or chopped rosemary to the half-and-half before pouring it over the potatoes.

Recipe: Potatoes au Gratin

4. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

Instead of taking up valuable stovetop real estate, let your slow cooker do the work. This complex cranberry sauce from Sarah DiGregorio uses a combination of cooked cranberries and crisp, fresh cranberries. Leave out the port if it’s not your thing, and don’t worry if you don’t have a slow cooker; there’s a stovetop method, too.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

5. Candied Sweet Potatoes

This glossy four-ingredient dish, which Melissa Clark adapted from “The Harvey House Cookbook,” calls for just sweet potatoes, butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt. It’s best served warm, not blazing hot, so it’s ideal for Thanksgiving, when sides have to wait around patiently for the turkey to finish.

Recipe: Candied Sweet Potatoes

6. Key Lime Pie

OK, so it’s not traditional pumpkin pie, but this cold and tangy dessert by Joyce LaFray Young will cheer up your taste buds after all of that rich Thanksgiving fare.

Recipe: Key Lime Pie

7. Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

Lidey Heuck adds lemon zest and crisped pancetta to roasted green beans for a simple, yet special side dish. This recipe serves 8 to 10, but it easily halves for a smaller group.

Recipe: Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

8. Make-Ahead Gravy

Save yourself the stress of making gravy under the watchful eyes of hungry diners by making it in advance. Mark Bittman’s version is one of our most popular Thanksgiving recipes because you can make it up to five days early. When you’re ready to eat, reheat and stir in some turkey drippings.

Recipe: Make-Ahead Gravy

9. Creamed Corn

This sunshine-y side from Amanda Hesser can be made with fresh or frozen corn. If using frozen, add a little water when cooking before you add the milk. If you want it creamier, whiz some of the cooked corn in a blender and stir it back into the pot.

Recipe: Creamed Corn

10. Vanilla Crème Brûlée

End the meal with something special and luxurious like this crème brûlée from Mark Bittman. You don’t need a blowtorch; your oven’s broiler will do. One important note: Chill the custard for several hours before browning the top, otherwise you’ll end up with custard soup.

Recipe: Vanilla Crème Brûlée

11. Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

Don’t bother peeling the butternut squash. Ali Slagle cuts it in half-inch slices before roasting, then finishes it with a tangy, spicy brown-butter vinaigrette and fresh mint.

Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

12. Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse With Fleur de Sel

Here’s a fun magic trick of a dessert that Melissa Clark adapted from the molecular gastronomist Hervé This: Melt good bittersweet chocolate, place it in an ice bath, then whip it by hand for 3 to 5 minutes (you’ll want help) until thick and fluffy. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: 5-Ingredient Recipes

Highlights

Categories
World News

18 Five-Ingredient Thanksgiving Recipes

You don’t have to plan and cook for days to have a memorable Thanksgiving meal. These simple recipes call for just five ingredients or fewer (not including salt and pepper), so you can get dinner on the table and get to the best part: eating.

1. Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

A scattering of pomegranate seeds makes this brussels sprouts dish from Colu Henry look fancy. But it’s really just a matter of roasting the sprouts with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, then tossing with chopped walnuts and the ruby seeds.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

2. Buttermilk-Brined Turkey Breast

Samin Nosrat’s buttermilk-brined roast chicken has long been one of NYT Cooking’s most popular recipes. It stands to reason then that the same technique applied to a whole turkey and turkey breast would yield extraordinary results.

Recipes: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey Breast and Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey

3. Potatoes Au Gratin

The key to Mark Bittman’s potatoes au gratin is to season as you go so that each slice of potato has flavor. (Potatoes suck up a lot of salt.) If you’re looking to up your game, add fresh thyme or chopped rosemary to the half-and-half before pouring it over the potatoes.

Recipe: Potatoes au Gratin

4. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

Instead of taking up valuable stovetop real estate, let your slow cooker do the work. This complex cranberry sauce from Sarah DiGregorio uses a combination of cooked cranberries and crisp, fresh cranberries. Leave out the port if it’s not your thing, and don’t worry if you don’t have a slow cooker; there’s a stovetop method, too.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

5. Candied Sweet Potatoes

This glossy four-ingredient dish, which Melissa Clark adapted from “The Harvey House Cookbook,” calls for just sweet potatoes, butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt. It’s best served warm, not blazing hot, so it’s ideal for Thanksgiving, when sides have to wait around patiently for the turkey to finish.

Recipe: Candied Sweet Potatoes

6. Key Lime Pie

OK, so it’s not traditional pumpkin pie, but this cold and tangy dessert by Joyce LaFray Young will cheer up your taste buds after all of that rich Thanksgiving fare.

Recipe: Key Lime Pie

7. Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

Lidey Heuck adds lemon zest and crisped pancetta to roasted green beans for a simple, yet special side dish. This recipe serves 8 to 10, but it easily halves for a smaller group.

Recipe: Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

8. Make-Ahead Gravy

Save yourself the stress of making gravy under the watchful eyes of hungry diners by making it in advance. Mark Bittman’s version is one of our most popular Thanksgiving recipes because you can make it up to five days early. When you’re ready to eat, reheat and stir in some turkey drippings.

Recipe: Make-Ahead Gravy

9. Creamed Corn

This sunshine-y side from Amanda Hesser can be made with fresh or frozen corn. If using frozen, add a little water when cooking before you add the milk. If you want it creamier, whiz some of the cooked corn in a blender and stir it back into the pot.

Recipe: Creamed Corn

10. Vanilla Crème Brûlée

End the meal with something special and luxurious like this crème brûlée from Mark Bittman. You don’t need a blowtorch; your oven’s broiler will do. One important note: Chill the custard for several hours before browning the top, otherwise you’ll end up with custard soup.

Recipe: Vanilla Crème Brûlée

11. Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

Don’t bother peeling the butternut squash. Ali Slagle cuts it in half-inch slices before roasting, then finishes it with a tangy, spicy brown-butter vinaigrette and fresh mint.

Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

12. Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse With Fleur de Sel

Here’s a fun magic trick of a dessert that Melissa Clark adapted from the molecular gastronomist Hervé This: Melt good bittersweet chocolate, place it in an ice bath, then whip it by hand for 3 to 5 minutes (you’ll want help) until thick and fluffy. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: 5-Ingredient Recipes

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

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World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

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Categories
World News

17 Recipes for a Small Thanksgiving Dinner

The safest choice this Thanksgiving is to cozy up to — and cook for — the people you live with. These lower-yield recipes don’t sacrifice on satisfaction. For even more festive options, you can cook your way through Melissa Clark’s menu for two, or explore this larger collection of Recipes for a Small Thanksgiving.

1. Brussels Sprouts With Pickled Shallots and Labneh

Nik Sharma is an expert at playing with texture and flavor. In this dish, he invigorates simply roasted brussels sprouts with creamy labneh, quick-pickled shallots and date syrup — but you could swap in honey or maple syrup for a sweetness that balances it all out.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Pickled Shallots and Labneh

2. Sweet Potato and Onion Dip

Whether you mash, candy, casserole or present them in pie form, sweet potatoes are an incredibly versatile Thanksgiving staple. Nicole Taylor bakes them gently to preserve their flavor, then mashes and mixes them with maple syrup, caramelized onions, ricotta and warm spices into a dip for grazing before the big meal.

Recipe: Sweet Potato and Onion Dip

3. Torrisi Turkey

Sam Sifton calls this recipe from Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone “about the moistest, most luxuriously flavorful turkey available on the planet: rich and buttery, deep with rich turkey taste.” Unlike many recipes, this one can be reduced by half without any tweaks to cook time; a single turkey breast will amply satisfy a family of four — and leave some leftovers.

Recipe: Torrisi Turkey

4. Twice-Baked Potatoes

Perhaps too labor-intensive for larger Thanksgiving gatherings — or occupying too much oven space — these twice-baked potatoes are crowd-pleasers that are an ideal fit for a small audience.

Recipe: Twice-Baked Potatoes

5. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

Blanched in boiling water until just crisp-tender, then sautéed with oil, ginger and garlic, these green beans effortlessly add brightness to any spread. They are wonderful as is, but if you crave more texture, you can top them with some homemade or store-bought fried garlic, shallots or onions, for a simpler spin on the traditional casserole.

Recipe: Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

6. Herby Bread-and-Butter Stuffing for Two

Melissa Clark has taken the guesswork out of cooking for two with this classic herbed stuffing — which fits into an entire menu of Thanksgiving dishes suited for a tiny party.

Recipe: Herby Bread-and-Butter Stuffing for Two

7. Roast Turkey Breast

When roasting an entire bird, one complaint dominates: The white meat often cooks faster than the dark meat. Roasting a turkey breast allows you to focus on achieving perfectly succulent meat; a three-pound breast should provide plenty for a family of four.

Recipe: Roast Turkey Breast

8. Creamed Spinach

This refreshingly verdant creamed spinach dish from Pierre Franey allows spinach to shine by opting for a high ratio of greens to dairy. The blanched greens are blended, then stirred into a simple béchamel sauce, which complements their flavor without dominating.

Recipe: Creamed Spinach

9. Pecan Pie Sandwich Cookies

Fitting for a pandemic — or any other occasion — these delicate, crumbly brown sugar shortbread cookies sandwich a gooey pecan-praline filling. Inspired by pecan pie, these cute cookies are meant for sharing.

Recipe: Pecan Pie Sandwich Cookies

10. Creamy Macaroni and Cheese

Tackle this recipe as is, and you might find yourself with more than your share of creamy, baked Cheddar-and-cottage-cheese pasta. But you can easily halve it: Simply cook it in a smaller dish for the same amount of time, or spread it thinly across the same vessel, increasing the surface area to yield a higher rate of deliciously browned bits of toasted cheese on top.

Recipe: Creamy Macaroni and Cheese

11. Buttermilk-Brined Roast Chicken

Samin Nosrat’s gloriously golden roast chicken proves that there’s no need to feel tied to turkey for the holiday table. Marinate it in buttermilk overnight to guarantee juicy results.

Recipe: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Chicken

12. Spicy Red Pepper Cranberry Relish

If you like, you can easily halve this punchy relish from David Tanis, reducing the cook time by two or three minutes, but you might find good use for the full yield: It will keep refrigerated for up to two weeks and works well slathered on just about any sandwich.

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

The Buttermilk-Brined Turkey of Your Thanksgiving Dreams

For someone who didn’t grow up celebrating Thanksgiving, I’ve got a lot of strong opinions about turkey.

It’s probably because I’ve cooked more of it than practically anyone I know, in just about more ways than I can list. I’ve roasted, braised, grilled, spit-roasted and deep-fried it. I’ve boned it out and made “turchetta.” I’ve dry-brined it, wet-brined it, injected it with brine and stuffed slabs of herbed butter under its skin. I’ve built a makeshift cinder-block oven to cook it at a friend’s farm that lacked a kitchen. I’ve even cooked 20 turkeys in a night, working the holiday in a restaurant.

And I once took an impromptu call from the famed rancher Bill Niman. He was just starting to raise heritage turkeys, and wondered if he could swing by with seven different breeds for me to cook for a blind tasting. I figured why not, and threw myself into the challenge, roasting all of the breasts and right legs, and braising all of the left legs. I remember that I took lots of notes and that some birds tasted much more turkey-ish than others.

As I look back on all of this poultry, though, one thing is clear: No matter how complicated or technical the preparation, no one turkey I’ve ever cooked has been that much more exciting to eat than any other. (Though if it was underseasoned or overcooked, it was certainly less exciting to eat.)

The truth is, deep down in my heart, I’ve always secretly hoped that if I cook it just right, a roast turkey will emerge from the oven as tender and juicy as a perfect roast chicken. And I suspect I’m not the only one who feels that way. But the fact of the matter is that it’s a different bird! And it has completely different qualities.

So let’s stop wishing our turkeys could be chickens, and let’s stop making ourselves unnecessarily miserable by complicating the cooking process. When it comes to turkey, simpler is better.

While I’ve finally, grudgingly, admitted that turkey isn’t chicken, it has occurred to me that I might be able to adapt my favorite roast chicken recipe for Thanksgiving. Three years ago, I published a recipe for three-ingredient, buttermilk-brined roast chicken in my book, “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat.” It’s now among the most beloved of my recipes, and every November, people reach out to ask if they can apply the technique to their holiday turkey.

I’ve always answered hesitantly — not having tested it, I wasn’t sure that the skin wouldn’t grow too dark with the longer cooking time, or that the seasoning would be balanced. This year, I figured it was time to try it out for myself.

I set about tinkering, and the first thing I changed was timing. The chicken takes a simple overnight dip in the buttermilk, but a turkey weighs three times as much as a chicken, so it needs to spend a full 48 hours in the brine to ensure the meat is tender and properly seasoned throughout.

Next, the salt. Unlike the original chicken recipe, which leaves things to chance, I decided to specify the turkey brine’s ideal salinity — no one wants a bland holiday bird. But I’m a pragmatist, and I know that we’re not all using the same type of salt. I also know that different salts have different levels of salinity by volume, but not by weight. So, if you’ve got one, I encourage you to use a scale to measure out your salt to ensure a balanced brine. It’s just about the trickiest part of the recipe, and I promise you won’t regret it.

The last and most obvious change was my decision to spatchcock the turkey. By removing its backbone and flattening it out, I cut the cooking time by more than half. While in the chicken recipe, the lactose in the buttermilk contributes to perfectly golden-brown skin, I’d worried that a turkey’s significantly longer cooking time might yield a blackened bird.

Spatchcocking put an end to that fear. Furthermore, laying the bird out flat means there’s greater surface area for browning — more of that dark, lacquered skin for everyone.

An unexpected boon of spatchcocking is how beautifully it streamlines the entire brining process: Without a backbone, the turkey can just be folded in half and slipped into a two-gallon zipper-top plastic bag containing the buttermilk and salt. There’s no unwieldy pot or bowl taking up all of your refrigerator space. Just slip the bag in wherever it fits, turn it two or three times a day, and that’s it. Simplicity is everything here.

This year will require something different of many of us, whether that means gathering in smaller groups, eating alone on a Zoom call or forgoing some of our usual Thanksgiving comforts. So I’m offering three versions of this recipe, for whatever your holiday entails: the spatchcocked whole turkey; a brined breast, for those who want turkey for four to six people; and the classic buttermilk chicken, for those who may not want or be able to manage a turkey.

All of the variations yield incredibly tender meat that’s seasoned through and through, enveloped in that showstopping caramel-brown skin that’s such a pleasure to eat. And they’re all utterly simple and satisfying. In a year full of so many other complications, let your holiday bird be stress-free.

Recipes: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey | Buttermilk-Brined Turkey Breast | Buttermilk-Brined Roast Chicken

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Source: Samin Nosrat's Turkey

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